ielts-yasi.englishlab.net

Written May 21, 2018

 

IELTS Part 2 and Part 3 Topics and Questions

Page 161 

801.  An Activity Near the Sea (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

802.  A Plant (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

803.  A Clever Solution (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

804.  Smiling People (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

805.  A Conversation with a Stranger (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

 

 

RETURN TO PART 2 TOPIC INDEX

FQ = frequent question = a question that has frequently been reported = a question that is probably in the examiner's question book

* = my guess at a question

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801.  An Activity Near the Sea (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

Describe a leisure activity you would like to do on or near the sea.

            You should say:

                                what it is

                                what preparations you would need to do

                                how easy it would be

            and explain why you would like to do this activity.

              .

Notes

  • This seems to be a new topic.

  • Some people have reported this Part 2 as, " ... on or near the sea or a river".

  • Some people have reported this topic as, "Describe a leisure activity you like to do on or near the sea" but I am almost certain that it is "would like". What you "like" to do refers to a habit or something that you do quite often. "Would like" refers to an activity that you have not yet done (or tried). It's an aspiration, a bit like a dream or a gaol.

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Possible follow-up questions:

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Part 3

See also the Part 3 questions of Topic 407, Topic 456 & Topic 524

At a Beach

Work on or Near the Sea

Living Near the Sea

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802.  A Plant (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

Describe an important plant in your country (such as a vegetable, fruit or flower).

            You should say:

                                what plant it is

                                what it looks like *

                                where it grows

              and explain why it is important.              .

 

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Possible follow-up questions:

  •  Have you ever grown a plant yourself?

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Part 3

See also the Part 3 questions of Topic 458

Crops

  • How did you learn about that plant?

  • Do you think it could be used for other purposes (in addition to what you said in Part 2)?

  • Do you know any other plants that are useful?

  • What would you say is the main (or most important) crop in your countryFQ

  • What are some examples of the vegetables (or plants for food) that are grown in your country?

Growing Plants

  • Do you like growing plants?

  • (Possibly the question above is this) Would you like to grow some plants?

  • Do people in your country like growing plants?

  • Where do they usually grow things?

  • What are the benefits from letting a child grow something (in a garden)?

  • Can you explain why some people grow their own vegetables?  FQ

  • What do you think are the differences between vegetables that someone buys and vegetables that they grow themselves?

  • In the future, do you think more people will grow their own vegetables, or fewer people?

Farming

  • Have you ever done any farm work?

  • Do you think farming is (or would be) a good job?  See Note 4

  • Do you farming equipment today is the same as it was many years ago?

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803.  A Clever Solution (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

Describe someone you know who used a clever solution to solve a problem

               You should say:

 who it was

 what the problem was

 what the solution was

    and explain why you think this solution was clever.              .

 

Notes

  • This seems to be a new topic.

  • "Clever solutions" can sometimes involve making something, or finding a clever way to repair something that is broken. Other examples of clever solutions might involve finding a way to "get around" a regulation or law by finding a "loophole". Another type of clever solution might involve using something for a purpose that it was not originally intended for. Yet another example of being clever might involve tricking a person (or people) or an animal (or animals) to achieve a desired result.

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Possible follow-up questions:

  • Have you told anyone else about this clever solution (or, this clever person)?

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Part 3

See also the Part 3 questions of Topic 534 and Topic 214

Problem Solving

Exceptional Children  

See Note 5,  See Note 6

Intelligent Machines 

See Note 7

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804.  Smiling People (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

Describe a time you saw a lot of people smiling..

               You should say:

 who they were

 where it was

 .................

 and explain why they were smiling.

              .

Notes

  • I don't know what that missing line on the card says. It might be, "when it happened" or, "what the occasion was" or, "why they were there" or, "who you were with".

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Possible follow-up questions:

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Part 3

See also any relevant questions in the Part 3 of Topic 404, 633, 494 & Topic 750. Those topics are more about laughing than smiling.

Note! It is possible that both the words, "smile" and "laugh" are used for some of these questions, especially in the sub-topic, Expressing & Controlling Emotions.

Smiling

Expressing & Controlling Emotions

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805.  A Conversation with a Stranger (May. 2017)   (Probably no longer used)

Describe an interesting conversation you had with a stranger. *

            You should say:

                                who it was with

                                (when and) where it was

                                what you talked about

            and explain why it was interesting.

.              .

Notes

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Possible follow-up questions:

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Part 3

See also any relevant questions in the Part 3 of Topic 664, 582, 500, 329, Topic 256, 198, Topic 193 & 185

Talking to Strangers

Communication

Chatting

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Note 1

Building sand castles and digging in the sand.

Note 2

It seems that the question uses the words, "old people", who are people over the age of about 60. But it's possible that the real wording is "children or adults" or, "children or older people" where "older people" means "people older than children".

In fact, some people have clearly reported that "children and adults" were the words used. Possibly variations of this question are used by different examiners.

Note 3

If words like, "a tough life" are used, they can be interpreted in two different ways: a) "a tough life" meaning dangerous and/or hard work and, b) "a tough life" = a hard life because they don't make much money. Some fishermen make quite a lot of money.

"Fishers" is used by some people and is acceptable although it sounds strange to some native English speakers.

Note 4

If you answer, "Yes" to the question, "Have you ever done any farm work?" then the question will be, "Do you think farming is a good job?

If you answer, "No" to the question, "Have you ever done any farm work?" then the question will be, "Do you think farming would be a good job?

If the words, "would be" are used instead of "is" then the meaning is, "Would it be a good job for you?" or, "Do you think you would find it to be a good job if you did that job?"  You will earn more grammar points if you answer using "would" for a question that is asked using, "would".

Note 5

I have given this sub-topic the title of "Exceptional Children" although people who reported getting this topic seem to imply that the topic is "Clever Children". If the examiners really said something like, "Let's talk about clever children" then I think the creators of the IELTS test made a mistake and, moreover, are insulting the world's children. This is because ALL normal, healthy children are clever, although some might be much more clever than others! If you label the most clever as "Clever Children" then would the other children be labelled as, "Stupid Children"?

Note 6

There are several different words that more or less mean the same as, "intelligent" (in Chinese, 聪明).

"Intelligent" is the more accurate and educated word. It has the idea of deep or broad intellectual development, a strong ability to solve complex problems, especially abstract problems and an ability to learn quite fast.

"Clever" is used in British English to mean "intelligent" but it is more colloquial (less educated-sounding) than the word, "intelligent". Among native English speakers who are not British, "clever" is used more to describe a  more innovative, more skilful or a more intelligent than average way to do something, or the person who does it. For example, we say a magician is "clever" or the magician performs "clever" magic tricks. People who are good at deceiving others are often described as "clever" and their deceptions are also often described as "clever".

"Smart" is the American equivalent of the British, "clever". That is, it means "intelligent" but it is also more colloquial (less educated-sounding) than the word, "intelligent". In British English, "smart" means something completely different to the American meaning it means "well-groomed and well-dressed" in British English and only describes a person's appearance.

"Bright" is mostly used to describe people, especially children, who are fast learners. Bright children often also have a bright, alert personality. Other words that are used more or less in the same way as "bright" are, "sharp" and "quick".

The word, "wise" is NOT used to mean intelligent. Wise people have learned a lot from experience, especially from their own mistakes or by learning from the mistakes of others. Consequently, "wise" people are usually older people who have had many years of life experience. Wise people might not be exceptionally fast learners or exceptionally good at solving complex problems of a mechanical, spatial or abstract nature. Most wisdom is related to human relations or everyday human activities, such as a farmer making wise decisions concerning his crops. (We could also say the farmer made "intelligent decisions" concerning his crops. So "intelligent" can sometimes be used to mean "wise", but "wise" cannot be used to mean "intelligent", as it is defined above.)  It's quite normal to describe a child as "intelligent" but a child is never described as "wise" unless we mean that the child is showing wisdom equivalent to the wisdom of a much older person. The expression, "wise words" usually means the same as "good advice".

Note 7

"Intelligent machines" basically means robots equipped with a computer program, especially a program that "learns".

Note 8

"The day after tomorrow" means, "almost immediately".

Note 9

"To smile" and "to laugh" are two different actions. (Chinese: 微笑 = to smile, 发笑 = to laugh.) Laughter has sound; smiling doesn't. It is possible the examiner will ask you questions about both smiling and laughing since this topic is about expressing emotions in general.

In Asia, it seems that some people actually do laugh in some situations when most other people, especially Westerners normally just smile. Once when I was living in South Korea I went for a hike on a mountain where many of the other hikers were old people. I clearly remember seeing one group of old people chuckling to themselves (a form of light laughter) as they walked along to express the pleasure they were experiencing when most people would simply smile to express their pleasure. (Or maybe they were chuckling at the sight of me!)

Note 10

To "control one's emotions" means both to control how much you experience an emotion, and also to control how much you express or show that you have this emotion,

Note 11

Laughter to cover one's embarrassment is quite common.