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Adverbs

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A: Adverbs Used at the beginning of a sentence, followed by a comma.

 

A1: Expressing Feeling

 

Amazingly,

Sadly,  

Astonishingly,

Seriously,

Curiously,

Strangely,

Disappointingly,                   

Surprisingly,

Fortunately,

Thankfully,

Frankly, 

(Be careful - overused and sometimes incorrectly used.)

Tragically,

Happily,

Unbelievably,

Hopefully,

Unfortunately,

Luckily,

Unluckily,

Regrettably,

 

 

A2: Expressing Personal Opinion or Judgment

Admittedly,

Miraculously,

Allegedly,

Mysteriously,

Apparently,

Naturally,

Appropriately,

Obviously,

Clearly,

Paradoxically,

Conveniently,

Personally,

Foolishly,

Plainly,

Ideally,

Presumably,

Importantly,

Remarkably,

Incredibly,

Superficially,

Inevitably,

Undeniably,

Inexplicably,

Undoubtedly,

Interestingly,

Unjustly,

Ironically,

Unnaturally,

A3: Expressing a Logical Idea

Accordingly,

Hypothetically,  

Actually,

Immediately,  

Additionally,

Incidentally,  

Alternatively,

Lastly,

Basically,

Logically,

Certainly,

Officially,

Characteristically,

Possibly,

Coincidentally,

Potentially,

Conceivably,

Predictably,

Consequently,

Previously,

Consistently,

Probably,

Conversely,

Realistically,

Correctly,

Roughly (speaking),

Definitely,

Secondly,

Equally,

Significantly,

Essentially,

Similarly,

Eventually,

Specifically,

Evidently,

Subsequently,

Finally,

Supposedly,

Firstly,

Technically (speaking),

Fundamentally,

Theoretically,

Generally,

Typically,

   

A4: Used at the beginning of sentences for dramatic effect

(This list shows just a few examples)   

Arrogantly,

Proudly,

Carelessly,

Reluctantly,

Casually,

Sensibly,

Childishly,

Unexpectedly,

Courageously,

Unwillingly,

Cunningly,

Wisely,

Desperately,

 


 

A5: Indicating the area where a situation exists

 

Globally,

Locally,

Internationally,

Nationally,

 

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B: Adverbs used at other places in a sentence, not followed by a comma.

B1: Adverbs of manner

This is the largest group of adverbs. Here are some examples – there are many more.


abruptly

professionally

carefully

rapidly

carelessly

simply

closely

softly

dramatically

steadily

distinctly

steeply

easily

strangely

explicitly

superbly

formally

thickly

frankly

thoroughly

patiently

urgently

plainly

vividly

politely

voluntarily

 

B2: Adverbs of Degree

 
 

absolutely

purely

approximately

quite

completely

radically

considerably

really

drastically

reasonably

entirely

roughly

extensively

scarcely

extremely

seemingly

fairly

simply

fully

simply

greatly

sincerely

gradually

slightly

hardly

somewhat

largely

strongly

nearly

thoroughly

noticeably

totally

outright

tremendously

partly

truly

poorly

utterly

positively

very

powerfully

virtually

pretty

well

profoundly

 

bookmark

B3: Adverbs that Focus on the Most Relevant Thing, or Restrict

bookmark

alone

particularly

chiefly

predominantly

especially

primarily

exclusively

principally

just

purely

mainly

simply

mostly

solely

notably

specially

only

specifically


B4: Adverbs of Frequency

always

occasionally

constantly

often

continually

periodically

continuously

rarely

ever

regularly

frequently

repeatedly

from time to time

seldom

hardly ever

sometimes

infrequently

sporadically

never

usually

normally

 

Notes for adverbs of frequency

  1. Some people confuse the meaning of 'always' with 'often' or 'usually'. 'Always' means 'every time' (每一次). For example: "What do you do on Saturdays?" è "I always go shopping." This means that you go shopping every Saturday (or 99% of Saturdays). This might be true but 'usually' or 'often' seem to be better choices. Some people overuse the word 'always'.
  2. 'Always' can also be used as an adverb of duration (how long), meaning 总是, when talking about the past or 永远 for the future. For example: "I've always worked in the IT industry." and, "I'll always love you."
  3. 'Ever' is used in a question but not in an affirmative (肯定的) statement (except for the type shown below at 4.). You can think of 'ever' as meaning, 'at least once'. For example: "Have you ever been to Tibet?" is correct. But, "I have ever been to Yunnan." is incorrect. Just say, "I have been to Yunnan." (I've been to Yunnan.)
  4. 'Ever' can be used in one type of affirmative sentence, when we include the idea of + 形容词 and the present perfect tense (现在完成时)。For example, "That's the best book I've ever read.""He's the tallest man I've ever seen."

 

B5: Adverbs of Certainty

You should try to use these sometimes when you talk about the future.

certainly
definitely
surely
probably
possibly